Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Summer Reading...


It hardly seems possible that summer is almost over, even though the calendar says it's September. Kids are back to school and things are starting to look and feel fall-ish outside. In addition, there has been a lot of change for me in the last few months, ending my employment at the bookstore and starting a brand new job. Books have been keeping me company...here is what I've been reading...

THE POSSIBILITY DOGS by Susannah Charles
Charleson's second book, chronicling her exploration of working with rescue dogs to see if they can become service dogs. Filled with portraits of amazing dogs and their handlers as well as her own journey with Jake Piper (the dog on the cover!), this is a wonderful book. (see the full blog post here: http://www.notthenewyorktimesbookreview.blogspot.com/2013/07/a-new-book-and-we-got-to-meet-her.html)

UNDER THE DOME (audio) by Stephen King
My new job is a bit further away from home than my last one, so I've been exploring audiobooks for my commute. Listening to UNDER THE DOME was fun. Stephen King is so good at developing many story threads and keeping the reader interested in all of the characters. I didn't totally love the ending (i.e. the why of the dome), but did love listening to the townspeople of Chester's Mill struggle with living - and dying - Under the Dome.

WHERE'D YOU GO, BERNADETTE? Maria Semple (audio)
Another audiobook for my drives to and from work. I'd picked up this book several times when I worked at the bookstore and almost bought it. It didn't totally grab me, though, so I didn't. Bee, a precocious teenager, tells most of the story, starting with her presenting one wish to her parents - for the family to take a trip to Antarctica! Bernadette is Bee's mother, who isn't quite sure she can handle a trek to far off southern lands. Kathleen Wilhoite reads the audio version and does a great job. Enjoyable!

LITTLE WITCH by Anna Elizabeth Bennett
I'd loved this book as a child and recently tried to find a copy. It was a delight to discover that a 60th Anniversary edition of this book was being released! I, of course, ordered one. Alas, in rereading it I discovered that this book didn't quite hold up for me. I'd read it many times as a child and remember thoroughly loving it then. Is this one of those books that should have remained wonderful in my memory? Perhaps.

AND THE MOUNTAINS ECHOED Khaled Hosseini
This was stunning. A father tells a tale to his children before bed one night. The next day he gives up one of his children through economic necessity. What happens to that child? What happens to the child that was kept? What happens to the father? Beautifully written and evocative.

THE BELIEVERS by Zoe Heller
Heller wrote the deliciously evil WHAT WAS SHE THINKING? NOTES ON A SCANDAL. This, another by her, chronicles a family in post 9/11 New York. I didn't like it nearly as well, but did enjoy the clever dialogue and well-rounded portrayals of members of the Litvinoff family.

SONGS OF WILLOW FROST by Jamie Ford
Recently read and reviewed on this blog (http://www.notthenewyorktimesbookreview.blogspot.com/2013/08/songs-of-willow-frost.html), I enjoyed this more than I thought I would.

LET'S EXPLORE DIABETES WITH OWLS by David Sedaris
Sedaris is back with more insightful and humorous essays about life. My Sedaris faves are WHEN YOU ARE ENGULFED IN FLAMES and ME TALK PRETTY ONE DAY, but I always love reading a new addition to the Sedaris canon.

A TALE FOR THE TIME BEING by Ruth Ozeki
Ruth (main character Ruth) is a frustrated writer living in British Columbia. Washing up on shore comes some things from Japan. Alternating between Ruth's narration and the Japanese teenager, owner of the things that washed up on shore, this is original and well-done.

THE OCEAN AT THE END OF THE LANE by Neil Gaiman
I may have read this too quickly. A short novel, this is one to be savoured. There is magic here.

WONDER by R.J. Palacio
August is a child with a severe cranial deformities. He's just a regular kid on the inside. His struggles are mostly dealing with others who encounter his outside and are less than kind. Even though this is billed as a "children's book", I enjoyed reading Auggie's story. Absolutely worth reading.

SAHARA by Michael Palin (audio)
I love Michael Palin and have since Monty Python. After Python, Palin moved into travel and writing and filming travelogues of his journeys. Listening to Palin read about his travels was delicious, though I found that I missed having photos or visuals of his journey with this audio version.

Z: A NOVEL OF ZELDA FITZGERALD by Therese Anne Fowler
Along the lines of THE PARIS WIFE and THE AVIATOR'S WIFE, this chronicles the life of Zelda Fitzgerald, wife of F. Scott Fitzgerald. I greatly appreciate just the title of this book in that it is not defining Zelda's life solely by her relationship to her famous husband. (I have feelings about this! See this blog post: http://www.notthenewyorktimesbookreview.blogspot.com/2013/01/aviators-wife-paris-wife-pastors-wife.html.) Zelda had quite a life, and I enjoyed reading this novel about her.

NIGHT FILM by Marisha Pessl
There will be a longer blog post about this book. I don't want to say too much, as I'm not quite finished with it. But the book starts out that Ashley Cordova, daughter of Stanislas Cordova, director of deeply disturbing films, is dead. Pessl builds tension and intrigue as Scott McGrath investigates Ashley's death. Was it suicide? Or something more sinister?

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD by Harper Lee (audio, read by Sissy Spacek)
I read (and loved) TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD years ago. This audio version, read by Sissy Spacek, had been recommended to me many times by co-workers and bookstore customers. Listening to it I can see why. Spacek's voice is a perfect complement to this amazing novel.

               
                  
                  

What have you been reading this summer? Feel free to post here or on our facebook page, NOT The New York Times Book Review! Clicking on the book covers will take you to Amazon's web page for each book. Purchasing through these links helps support the blog. Thanks for stopping by!

8 comments:

  1. Loved: The Orphan Master's Son, Life After Life (the Kate Atkinson one) and When We Were the Kennedys by Monica Wood
    Very disappointed in: The Burgess Boys by Elizabeth Strout; Big Brother by Lionel Shriver

    I read Wonder a few months ago and thought it was incredible!

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    Replies
    1. The Orphan Master's Son has been on my radar...too bad about Elizabeth Strout's new one and Lionel Shriver. I loved (i.e. was haunted by) We Need to Talk About Kevin.

      Thanks for posting!

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  2. My favorite books of the summer were Jenni Fagan's THE PANOPTICON, Neil Gaiman's THE OCEAN AT THE END OF THE LANE, and THE NAME OF THE WIND by Patrick Rothfuss.

    Two new books, one older one.

    Also, am really exicted to read the new one from Marisha Pessl. Her first book was NUTS.

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  3. Pessl's first book was nuts...as in...amazingly good? I haven't read it. Yet. Everyone I've talked to who's read Rothfuss loves Name of the Wind (and him as a person). Ah...Neil Gaiman.

    ReplyDelete
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    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi there, thanks for posting! I manually code the HTML except for the links to book sites. I am connected to affiliate programs that provide that code. Blogger is easy to use, and I have friends that use WordPress and like it as well. Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
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